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Building Division
Responsibilities & Permit Information

The Building Division of the Development Department is responsible for all construction-related activities, including construction review,
permitting, and inspections. The City requires a permit for most construction activities including (but not limited to):

  • Interior and exterior renovations and additions
  • Windows & doors (new/replacement)
  • Plumbing & electrical (new/additions/replacements)            
  • Garage door replacement
  • Storm shutter installation
  • Siding
  • Gutters and downspouts
  • Signs, awnings, and banners
  • Roofs (new/replacement)
  • Air conditioning (new/replacement)

  • Paved driveway, sidewalk, or patio                              
  • Fences (new/replacement)
  • Tree removal
  • Sheds
  • Carports & screen rooms
  • Swimming pools, spas & enclosures
  • Wood decks
  • Boat docks, lifts, and davits
  • Seawall repair       

As a homeowner, you may obtain a building permit for work you are doing on your home. However, unless you reside in your home, a
licensed contractor must do the work. The following items do not need a permit:

  • Fascia and soffit installation and repair
  • Installation of water softeners
  • Wall and floor covering
  • Landscaping

Property Jurisdiction: 

Before contacting the Development Department, check the Pasco County Property Appraiser’s website to ensure that the property you are
inquiring about is located in the City of New Port Richey’s jurisdiction.  Not all properties within New Port Richey zip codes are located in the
city limits.

 

Inspections: 

To schedule an inspection of any kind, please call (727) 853-1048. 

Click here to check on the status of an inspection.   

 

Contractor Licensing: 

The City of New Port Richey utilizes Pasco County’s contractor licensing system.  Therefore, if you are licensed and registered to do work in
Pasco County, you are licensed and registered to do work in New Port Richey.

We do not require Certificates of Liability or Worker’s Compensation.


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Residential Rental Inspection Program

The City has adopted building maintenance standards and a rental inspection program in order to support property values and enhance citizen's quality of life. The purpose of the inspection program is to proactively identify blighted and deteriorated rental properties and ensure that these properties meet minimum standards.   

An initial external inspection of rental property will be conducted, at no charge to the owner/tenant.  Items to be inspected include those on the checklist below.  For more information, contact Derek Debus, Residential Rental Inspector, at 727-853-1041.

Owners of rental properties in the City must obtain a Residential Rental Permit annually (valid January–December) for $35 per property.  
Download and print a Residential Rental Permit application


Questions?  Check out those that are frequently asked here.


Resident Testimonials

I am very pleased with what the city is trying to do, as my rental house is affected by the neighborhood and how others keep up their properties in the area.  I appreciate all your efforts to keep property values up and neighborhoods looking clean.

-Deborah C.  
   


Residential Rental Inspection Checklist

What is inspected? Code What is required?

 Residential Rental Permit

6-130(a) 

Residential Property Permit required each year

NECESSARY FACILITIES  

 Garbage disposal facility

6-121 

Proper garbage storage containers

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM

 Electrical requirements

6-123

Fixtures, receptacles, equipment and wiring to be maintained  

 Exposed cable           

6-123(4)

Protected within 8’ of ground

STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS          

 Foundations

6-124(1)

Maintained

 Exterior walls

6-124(2) 

Sound and good condition

 Roofs

6-124(3)

Maintained, 3 month limit on tarps

Stairs and porches

6-124(5)

Safe, sound condition

 Exterior railings

6-124(6)

Required stairs above 3 risers, above 30”

 Windowpanes

6-124(8)

Maintained

 Window and door coverings

6-124(11)

Not covered for more than 3 months consistent with the primary façade

 Exterior windows and doors

6-124(13)

Weather tight, rodent proof and maintained

 Screens

6-124(14)

Owner responsible for install and maintenance

 Protective treatment

6-124(14)

All exterior wood shall be protected           

 Accessory structure

6-124(16)

Garage and storage maintained

 Sidewalks and drives

6-124(21) 

Sidewalks, walkways, drives, stairs, parking places kept in good repair

 Grading and drainage

6-124(22)

Maintained to prevent erosion of soil, and accumulation of stagnant water           

SANITATION REQUIREMENTS

 Public areas

6-126(1)

Owner of 2 or more dwelling units responsible for maintaining public areas

 Cleanliness

6-126(2)  

Occupants required to clean and sanitize           

 Garbage disposal

6-126(3)

Owner or occupant responsible for disposal in clean and sanitary manner           

 Care of premise

6-126(4)

No abandoned vehicles, rubbish appliance etc.

 Extermination

6-126(5)

Owner responsible for extermination of insects, rodents, varmints etc.

RESIDENTIAL MAINTENANCE

 Res. General maintenance

6-129(1)

Free of mildew, moss, dirt, soot etc.

 Res. painted surfaces      

6-129(2) 

Free of blistering, chalking etc.

 Metal and tile roofs

6-129(3)

Maintained       

 Res. maintenance of roofs

6-129(3)

Free of holes, cracks, leaks or showing signs of corrosion and deterioration


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Florida Building Code 5th Edition (2014) Effective June 30, 2015

The updated Florida State Building Codes are mandatory for all new construction or rehabilitation projects with a permit application
date of June 30, 2015 or later. 


One of the most visible changes from the 2010 codes is the reformatting of the Energy Code, which now consists of two independent
sub-documents: one for low-rise residential and one for commercial or high-rise residential. The Florida Building Commission also
expanded options for compliance methods for commercial and high-rise residential buildings to including the 
allowance of American
Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) 90.1.

More information is available at the Florida Building Commission’s website, www.floridabuilding.org.
    
                                                                                                  _____________________________________

   
Improved ISO Building Code Effectiveness Grade Received! 

The Building Code Effectiveness Grading Schedule (BCEGS) assesses the building codes in effect in a particular community and
how the community enforces its building codes. Special emphasis is placed on mitigation of losses from natural hazards. The
concept is simple: cities with well-enforced, up-to-date codes should demonstrate better loss experience and insurance rates can
reflect that.

The prospect of lessening damage from catastrophic events and, ultimately, lowering insurance costs is an incentive for
communities to enforce their building codes rigorously. The anticipated upshot is safer buildings, less damage, and lower insured losses
from catastrophes.


The BCEGS program gives each municipality a grade of 1 (exemplary commitment to building-code enforcement) to 10. ISO develops
advisory rating credits that apply to ranges of BCEGS classifications (1-3, 4-7, 8-9, 10). ISO gives insurers BCEGS classifications,
BCEGS advisory credits, and related underwriting information.


The Department's Building Services Division worked earnestly to achieve a Class 3 grading for one/two-family
residential properties and a Class 2 for commercial and industrial property (improved from a Class 3).


ISO began implementing the program in states with high exposure to wind (hurricane) hazards, then moved to states with seismic 
exposure, and has continued through the rest of the country.
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Information on Mold
The Florida Department of Health has developed the following information to address some of the most common questions and concerns about indoor mold, how it affects human health, and ways in which you can prevent or remove it.
    

How Can I tell if there is mold in my home, or should I test my home for mold?
Indoor mold growth can usually be seen or smelled. In most cases, if visible mold growth is present, sampling is not needed. There are no health or exposure-based standards that you can use to evaluate a mold sampling result. The Florida Department of Health does not recommend mold testing or sampling to see if you have a mold problem, or to see what kind of mold might be growing. Sampling for mold in the air can be expensive and, if done, should only be done by experienced professionals. Investigate a mold problem; don't test.
   

•  Look for visible mold growth (it may look cottony, velvety, rough, or leathery and have different colors like white, gray, brown, black, yellow, or green). Mold often appears as a staining or fuzzy growth on furniture or building materials (walls, ceilings, or anything made of wood or paper). Look for signs of moisture or water damage (water leaks, standing water, water stains, condensation, etc.).

•  Check around air handling units (air conditioners, furnaces) for standing water. Routinely inspect the evaporator coils, liner surfaces, drain pans and drain lines.

•  Search areas where you notice mold odors. If you can smell an earthy or musty odor, you may have a mold problem.
    
•  If mold-allergic people have some of the symptoms listed above when in your home, you may have a mold problem.
        

How can I prevent mold growth?
Water is the key. Without it, mold growth cannot start, much less multiply and spread. The easiest way to prevent the mold from gaining a foothold is to control dampness. Keep your home clean and dry. When water stands for even 24 hours, common molds can take hold. Keeping humidity levels below 60% and venting moisture from showering and cooking to the outside are several ways to prevent the conditions that can lead to mold growth. Other ways include:
    
•  Clean and dry up spills within 24 hours
    
•  Dry out wet building materials and carpets within 24 hours

•  Use an air conditioner or a dehumidifier to reduce the indoor humidity levels below 60%. If you have a central air conditioning system and need a dehumidifier to reduce relative humidity below 60%, you should have the air conditioning system examined for problems
      

•  Do not carpet bathrooms or basements

•  Note: While most experts suggest a relative humidity of less than 60%, below 50% is best for controlling both mold growth and dust mites. Dust mites are microscopic animals related to spiders, ticks and other mites. Dust mites eat mold and dead human or animal skin scales (flakes) and leave allergenic proteins. Dust mites reduce allergen production at these lower humidity levels.

How should mold be cleaned?    
Mold should be cleaned as soon as it appears. Persons who clean the mold should be free of symptoms and allergies. Small areas of mold should be cleaned using a detergent/soapy water or a commercial mildew or mold cleaner. Gloves and goggles should be worn during cleaning. The cleaned area should then be thoroughly dried. Throw away any sponges or rags used to clean mold.
        

If the mold returns quickly or spreads, it may mean you have an underlying problem, such as a water leak. Any water leaks must first be fixed when solving mold problems. If there is a lot of mold growth, consult the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's booklet: "Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings". It is available free at the EPA Indoor Air Quality Information Clearing house website. If the moldy material is not easily cleanable, such as drywall, carpet padding and insulation, then removal and replacement may be necessary.  Also visit the EPA's Indoor Air Quality page.

Should bleach or other biocides (disinfectants, sanitizers, or fungicides) be used to kill mold?
    
Using bleach or other chemicals to kill indoor mold growth is not needed in most cases. The goal should be to remove mold growth by cleaning or removing moldy materials. Dead mold can still pose health risks if you are exposed. Using bleach or other disinfectants on surfaces after mold removal may be needed where people are thought to be susceptible to fungal infections (such as a person with immune system problems). Should you decide to use bleach or another chemical, please read and carefully follow the label directions and hazard statements (caution, warning, danger). Do not mix bleach with ammonia cleaners or acids, because a dangerous chlorine gas may be formed.

Who should do the cleanup?
Who should do the cleanup depends on a number of factors. One consideration is the size of the mold problem. If the moldy area is less than about 10 square feet (less than roughly a 3 ft. by 3 ft. patch), in most cases, you can handle the job yourself. However,
    
•  If there has been a lot of water damage, and/or mold growth covers more than 10 square feet, consult the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guideline: "Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings. Although written about schools and commercial buildings, this document also helps when dealing with mold in other building types.
   

•  If you choose to hire a contractor (or other professional service provider) to do the cleanup, make sure the contractor has experience cleaning up mold. Check references and ask the contractor to follow the recommendations in EPA's "Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings, the guidelines of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), or other guidelines from professional or government organizations.

•  If you think the heating or air conditioning (HVAC) system may be contaminated with mold, read the EPA's guide "Should You Have the Air Ducts in Your Home Cleaned?" before taking further action. Visit the EPA website.

•  If you have concerns regarding your health before starting the cleanup, consult your doctor.

•  Note: The EPA suggests the following: "Do not run the HVAC system if you know or suspect that it is contaminated with mold - it could spread mold throughout the building". Unfortunately, it is thought that most, if not all, heating and air conditioning systems in Florida will support mold growth at some point. Stopping the use of an air conditioning system due to suspected mold growth would make most Florida buildings very uncomfortable during hot and humid weather. Should you turn off an air conditioner if a mold problem in the system is found? Ideally, yes. The system should be shut down while cleaning or mold removal is performed. If the water and/or mold damage was caused by sewage or other contaminated water, then call a professional who has experience cleaning and fixing buildings damaged by contaminated water.
   

Who can I call if I suspect that I have a mold problem, or if I want more information on mold?  
For additional information about the health effects of mold exposure and information on the safe removal of mold, please call your County Health Department's Environmental Health Office, the Florida Department of Health, Radon and Indoor Air Program at 1-800-543-8279, or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's website. If you have a mold complaint about an apartment, hotel or workplace, see our information on apartments and hotels or on Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) in workplaces.
     

What is the Florida Department of Health doing about mold?
The Florida Department of Health Indoor Air program helps with mold issues through the following activities:
    
•  Providing technical assistance and advice to the public, County Health Departments, School Districts and others
    
•  Distributing current information and other resources on mold and moisture control
       

Please note:

•  The Florida Department of Health does not provide mold testing

•  The Florida Department of Health does not provide support to professional consultants

   

What can the County Health Department do?
County Health Department staff should be able to:
    

•  Help you with the identification of mold problems and advise you on investigation techniques and clean-up methods

•  Answer your questions about health effects and possible hazards of mold exposure
    
•  Provide mold prevention advice into public message and disaster response plans

•  Direct concerned people to the appropriate local resources or to the Florida Department of Health Indoor Air Program staff

   

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Call us to assist you!

 

If you are unsure if you need a permit, please call the Building Division at (727) 853-1047.